ZKIZ Archives


The hot-money hot air 張化橋

http://blog.sina.com.cn/s/blog_50c88c400101l74x.html
Time 
to pour cold water on talk of 'hot money',

South China Morning Post, July 2013,

Joe Zhang says effect of speculators' cash on China's economy is negligible.

Joe Zhang

人們把不懂的現象歸結為鬼神,
*誰把熱錢輸送到中國?怎樣輸入?然後怎樣出去呢?
*你看見過熱錢嗎?
*陰謀論是無知者的遊戲。
*大家看了太多電影和小說。

Few commentators bother to ask about the practicalities of hot money creeping into China for profits. 

One evening in December 2011, as chairman of Wansui Micro Credit Company in Guangzhou, received call from the Guangzhou city government's finance office. On the line was Mr Liao who sternly reminded me that, as of that day, we had exceeded our credit ceiling by about 15 million yuan (HK$18.23 million at exchange rates then) and had three days to bring our loan portfolio back beneath it.

Even did not know we had exceeded the regulatory ceiling. started to sweat. How had our information been leaked to the regulator? Our panicky finance manager told me that all licensed lenders in China had their operating data linked to the supercomputers at the regulatory agency. Even our travel expense reimbursements were automatically being reported to it, in real time.

Barely two months later, as chief executive of Hong Kong-based company, found myself in Chongqing, explaining to several central bank officials at the local branch why we had remitted 200 million yuan from Hong Kong to certain account at the ICBC Bank in Chongqing. have to say that, much as dreaded that experience, was impressed with the IT infrastructure and by the close scrutiny of yet another regulatory agency.

Eventually, we were forced to reverse the transaction. We had done nothing wrong, but the three different regulators disagreed on the interpretation of particular rule. These two episodes and other experiences have convinced me that China's capital account controls are extremely efficient and effective. Sure, there may be some leaks, but they are negligible, not to mention that two-way flows cancel each other out.

Whenever there is upward pressure on the yuan, commentators habitually point to "hot money inflows" cash from investors seeking short-term profit. Conversely, they blame "hot money outflows". When the Chinese interbank interest rates surged recently, many claimed it was due to hot money fleeing China.

The confidence with which they analysed the situation reminds me of the ghost stories my mother told me as kid just so much hot air. have three reasons to dismiss such claims.

First, statistics are guesstimates anywhere, even more so in China, where the economy is undergoing rapid transformation. Due to careless reporting, cheating and weak enforcement of rules, perhaps 20 per cent rate of error is commonplace. For country with US$3.4 trillion of foreign reserves, and where total external trade exceeds US$3 trillion year, you can appreciate the magnitude of statistical errors. Sadly, many analysts reading tea leaves attribute these errors to "hot money flows".

Second, hot money exists on at least one precondition: the flows have to be easy, or costless. Where money flows are punishable by law, potential gains must far outweigh the costs. But the gains in China's case are elusive to say the least.

Hundreds of Chinese companies raise money in overseas capital markets each year. They have all experienced delays of up to two years in wiring money into China. Taking money out is easier, but not straightforward. On paper, it makes sense for hot money to sneak into China to capture higher interest rates and currency gains. But few commentators bother to ask about the practicalities.

Finally, it is easy to assert that there are some big players with huge pools of money to attach to China, but who are they? Foreign banks? No, they are subject to tough regulations. GE or IBM? They don't speculate. Rich tycoons? Their money is busy doing other things. Hedge funds? They may contemplate arbitrage opportunities, but not on such an "illiquid" situation as in China. Clearly, commentators need to get grip on the facts, rather than fiction.

Joe Zhang is the author of Inside China's Shadow Banking: The Next Subprime Crisis?
The hot-money hot air 張化 化橋
PermaLink: https://articles.zkiz.com/?id=61816


ZKIZ Archives @ 2019